Security tint envelopes are a paper product designed for sending sensitive information through the mail. They are most often used for financial documents, personal information like medical records, checks, government correspondence and anything else the sender or receiver wants to protect from unwanted viewing. Most security envelopes are the standard size #10, 4 1/8” x 9 1/2” envelopes or the slightly smaller #9 envelope.
Any business, organization or individual that respects the privacy of their recipient will use security envelopes as opposed to regular envelopes. Not doing so could mean that the sender will encounter liability for stolen personal information in some circumstance. In general, it is better to be safe than sorry and have a good stock of security envelopes on hand. This practice ensures that in a pinch you can mail something without having to worry about it being read by unwanted persons.

What Makes Security Envelopes Secure?

What makes a security envelope different than a regular envelope is the pattern printed on the envelope’s interior. This pattern either creates a tint that makes it hard to see through the envelope’s exterior or that garbles text contained in the envelope contents to the point that someone would be unable to read it. Most security patterns accomplish both through densely-printed designs that both baffle text and darken the envelope paper stock.
Without a security print, someone could easily intercept the letter and read some of it without ever opening the envelope. They do this most commonly by holding the envelope at an angle to a bright light so that some of the text or numbers printed on the contents shows through. There would be no evidence of tampering, but the unsavory individual will have gotten the information they needed to use in some way against the intended recipient.
Examples of this sort of secret tampering include reading routing and account numbers on a check, stealing identities through exposed social security numbers or gleaning information to later use as blackmail against someone. The nosy reader could be a regular criminal, a jealous ex-lover or even a roommate. No matter the person or the reason, reading private mail is illegal and being able to do so without leaving evidence makes the crime harder to trace.

Who Should Use Security Envelopes?

A good test is to consider whether the information contained inside the envelope is tailored to the recipient in any significant way or if the contents are almost completely identical to other documents being sent. Including something extremely private like a positive/negative health test diagnosis or a social security number would be considered “significant.”
Some of the most common scenarios in which security envelopes are used include:
● Bank or tax statements
● Legal processing
● Mailed checks
● Health documents
● Very personal correspondence
● Offers that contain sensitive information
● Anything with a social security number, account number or health information printed in the contents
In general, using a security envelope is more cost effective and less labor-intensive than trying to implement another security measure like a dark piece of paper covering the actual contents. Help automate your mail’s security measures with a security envelope that makes protecting personal information quick, easy and safe.
Visit our security envelop product listings to find an envelope style that meets your needs. Remember that any product can be custom-printed to give your recipient a more professional or personal touch.

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons